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The Honest Company, Eileen Fisher, and Ben & Jerry’s Headline New Public-private Campaign to Update Incentives for the High Road Workplace of the Future

For Immediate Release: 
September 26, 2016

Encourage All Employers to Sign on to Principles of High Road Workplace

Contact Info
Bob Keener
ASBC
617-610-6766

WASHINGTON, DC – A new campaign will help spread employee-focused workplace practices to more U.S. companies. Launched today by a business policy advocacy group, "The High Road Workplace Project: Policy Solutions for a Sustainable Economy," brings together the public and private sectors to expand incentives that will accelerate adoption of business practices supportive of employees.

“Many business leaders want to move as quickly as they can to the employee-centered workplace of the future, but are stuck with too many competitors still operating with models from the past,” said David Levine, Co-founder and CEO of ASBC. “The right policy incentives will accelerate the transition to a sustainable economy, by making high-road workplace practices the standard rather than the exception.”

“We recognize our employees are one of our biggest assets and a primary reason for our successes,” said Christopher Gavigan, Co-founder and Chief Purpose Officer of The Honest Company. “All business leaders should consider the very tangible benefits, and return on investment, from high-road workplace practices and start adopting them as quickly as possible.”

“High-road workplace practices have been part of our business model since we started almost 50 years ago,” said Kelly Vlahakis-Hanks, CEO of Earth Friendly Products. “We didn’t do it to be more profitable; we did it because valuing workers and support families were part of who we are. But over the years we’ve seen that high-road practices are profitable because they reduce turnover costs and increase productivity. Many companies underestimate the direct and indirect costs of employee turnover. We start our employees at $17 an hour and offer paid health insurance, sick time and family leave, and our products are still priced very competitively—some at the entry price point in the market."

The project, coordinated by the American Sustainable Business Council (ASBC), kicks off today with a campaign for businesses to sign on to a set of high-road workplace principles. The 10 far-reaching principles establish a collection of business practices supportive of employees, including providing family-friendly benefits, paying a living and fair wage, and governing fairly and transparently. Initial signers include Earth Friendly Products, Care.com, and Badger Balm in addition to Eileen Fisher, Ben & Jerry’s, and The Honest Company.

By endorsing the principles, businesses are agreeing that: 1) these principles represent the best practices of high road employers, 2) the business currently practices more than one of the best practices outlined,  and 3) the business intends to adopt more of these practices in the future as business model and policy changes allow.

During the next phase of the campaign, more business leaders across the country will be asked to join the campaign and give input about what support from government would help them and their counterparts at other companies adopt such workplace practices. In the final phase, participants will work with government to put those incentives in place.

The campaign was announced during ASBC’s 5th Annual Business Policy Summit held in Washington, DC and attended by over 150 business leaders from across the country.

More information about the High Road Workplace Project may be found here: http://asbcouncil.org/action-center/campaigns/principles-high-road-employers .

The American Sustainable Business Council advocates for policy change and informs business owners and the public about the need and opportunities for building a vibrant, sustainable economy. Through its national member network it represents more than 200,000 business owners, executives and investors from a wide range of industries. www.asbcouncil.org