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By Michael Peck
Posted on: April 6, 2017
Mortality is universal and bipartisan: black lives do matter and lower economic class, middle-aged white lives with a high school diploma or less are driving actuarial chart curves downward by dying off more quickly than they should. Causes are also bipartisan: disintegrating family cohesion, worsening job prospects in a rapidly decaying, inequality-driven culture that commoditizes the people who work, and inferior access to healthcare for the downtrodden including whites plagued by obesity, heart disease, diabetes and opiate addiction. Twenty-first century American exceptionalism and... read more
By MaryEllen Etienne
Posted on: March 30, 2017
In the environmental Reduce-Reuse-Recycle formula, “recycle” is best-known and “reduce” most obvious, but we can't achieve Zero Waste without all three -- and reuse offers the most interesting added benefits.In the corporate world, it’s savings. In the late 1990’s, Toyota began replacing cardboard gaylords and wooden pallets with reusable containers to ship parts to dealerships. In the early 2000’s, they began using these containers to ship parts, first from Japan to North America, then to distribution centers. Now, more than 65,000 reusable shipping containers carry109 million parts through... read more
By Eliza Kelsten
Posted on: March 23, 2017
Women’s History Month gives us the opportunity to reflect on how far women have come as well as on the opportunities presented by continuing inequities. A recent McKinsey study showed women still do the majority of unpaid labor, and as the Institute for Women’s Policy Research notes, women who are paid make, on average, 80 cents to every dollar made by a man.[1] Women also make up a larger part of the workforce than in the past. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, women are 47% of the American workforce, and 70% of women with children under 18 work.[2] As female workforce... read more
By Hazel Henderson
Posted on: March 19, 2017
The 2016 US election and similar trends in Europe all exhibited revolts against global corporate and financial dominance. In the US, Trump supporters, Tea Party members, Occupy Wall Street, Bernie Sanders supporters all targeted the unfairness the of elite Davos-Wall Street-London model of globalization. Many of the hand-lettered signs across this spectrum: "Where's My Bailout?", "No Corporate Trade Deals"; "Power to People" expressed the underlying outrage. As Trump and Sanders picked up these signals from across the spectrum, the grandees of both Republican and Democrat parties seemed tone... read more
By Sarah Severn
Posted on: March 6, 2017
I have worked on the issue of climate change and clean energy within corporate America for over two decades. During this time, I’ve participated in countless conversations on the topic in the C suite, the boardroom, in business organizations and government appointed taskforces. I’ve witnessed a growing acceptance of science and a clear acknowledgement about the fundamental risks that climate change poses. I have also seen an appreciation for the unique roles of both government and the market in creating solutions.Short Term Thinking Guarantees FailureOne constant presence during my corporate... read more
By John O'Neill
Posted on: February 15, 2017
Ever-increasing economic inequality has convinced millions of Americans the U.S. economy is failing them. Congress can reverse this decline and rebuild the middle class by supporting worker ownership of companies. It’s a proven way to increase wages, build wealth, strengthen companies and save communities.Ownership is key: Exponential wealth increases for the top percentage of Americans are due to their ownership of capital and capital income. Bill Gates, Warren Buffett, and the Koch brothers alone have as much wealth as the 128 million people in the bottom 40 percent, according to Having a... read more
By Joseph R. Blasi
Posted on: January 13, 2017
The United States is losing its once great middle class – and ways must be found to spread the fruits of economic growth if current trends are to be reversed. Capital ownership and capital income – ownership of companies, stocks, bonds, land, and financial instruments – have become very unequally distributed. Meanwhile, wages and salary gaps are growing, in part because the pay of many top earners is linked to capital income. The top ten percent of U.S. households now control almost three-quarters of all wealth and more than four-fifths of all financial assets. Half of households own no stock... read more
By John O'Neill
Posted on: January 4, 2017
The 2016 election gave Republicans control of the House, Senate, and White House. The last time Republicans held all three branches was during the Bush Administration from 2003 to 2005.Trump Administration policies – based on election rhetoric – are likely to be both right of center and controversial. That raises the question of how ASBC will address center-right, single-party rule?The answer: Express our strong opposition to policies that violate our core values. At the same time, we’ll look to collaborate with both President Trump and Congress when we share common interests. In both... read more
By Eidlin and O’Donnell
Posted on: December 19, 2016
Donald Trump’s nominee to lead the Small Business Administration (SBA), Linda McMahon, can actively facilitate job growth and a more robust economy just by leveling the playing field for small businesses.Small companies face big barriers such as federal policies favoring large companies, bank policies restricting access to affordable capital and banking industry consolidation that limits options. Yet small business development can broadly increase incomes and build wealth.McMahon will take over when many businesses are experiencing a shift in how they operate. More companies are adopting “... read more
By Phil Powell
Posted on: November 28, 2016
The 2016 campaign is over and Donald Trump is President-elect. Much of the post-election analysis has focused on the repercussions of Trump’s unexpected victory—the protests, the rage, and the scramble to assemble a new cabinet, staff, and national security team. While sustainability cannot count on the new Administration, it did succeed in a number of ballot measures adopted in some states.Voters in Florida and Nevada, for example, voted to adopt policies that will lead to more resilient, reliable energy production and distribution.In Florida, voters rejected a state constitutional amendment... read more

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