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By Taylor Walsh
Posted on: July 28, 2015
The summer of 2015 could be a turning point for making integrative health services the preferred healthcare choice for patients under their employer’s healthcare benefit. This is good news for companies looking for ways to reduce their health care costs as well as provide proven wellness approaches such as therapeutic massage, acupuncture and other ‘complementary’ modalities. Important forces are in play that will push insurance carriers and employers to take a serious look at this emerging class of care.For instance, in Minnesota, the Penny George Institute for Health & Healing (part of... read more
By David Brodwin
Posted on: July 28, 2015
One of greatest threats to the U.S. economy in the long term is the absurdly high cost of U.S. health care. We spend nearly 18 percent of GDP on it, whereas the rest of the developed world spends around 11 percent and gets about the same results.The difference damages the competitiveness of American businesses, and prevents American workers from prospering in the global economy. 7 percent of extra spending amounts to $1.2 trillion each year. If we didn't waste that money on health care that didn't work, we could double the number of K-12 public school teachers. And then we could make public... read more
By David Brodwin
Posted on: July 23, 2015
The U.S. now enjoys abundant energy supplies at lower prices, largely due to fracking, which uses hydraulic pressure to extract oil and gas from rock. Fracking is widely criticized for polluting groundwater, triggering earthquakes and delaying the switch to renewable energy sources. But without question, it has boosted America's energy supplies enormously.Prices have come down as production has soared. Total U.S. oil and gas output has roughly tripled from 2007 to 2014. In parts of New Jersey, which gets much of its gas from the Marcellus Shale deposit, "energy costs for residential and... read more
By Graham Willard
Posted on: July 13, 2015
The Community Wealth Building Network of Metro Denver released a report entitled “An Introduction to Financing for Cooperatives, Social Enterprises and Small Businesses.” Despite its Denver, CO origins, sustainable business organizations across the nation should take note.ASBC member Jason Wiener was one of the lead authors of the report, which discusses the ways businesses, foundations, and developers are acquiring funding to foster economic opportunity within low-income communities. There is general agreement that creating a business friendly environment in these communities requires “... read more
By David Brodwin
Posted on: July 12, 2015
Our capitalist economy has fueled a remarkable 200-year stretch of growth and prosperity. Despite periodic recessions (and sometimes worse), it has delivered substantial and broad-based improvement in our standard of living. So it's surprising, perhaps, that a growing voice is asking that we rethink how capitalism works and how it engages with the rest of society. This voice comes from respected institutions in the corporate mainstream as well as from the progressive left.Some of the most interesting and useful critique comes from executives and business owners who are firmly committed to the... read more
By Steve Klass
Posted on: June 29, 2015
When was the last time you went to a national park? If you’re like a great many Americans, it probably hasn’t been too long. In Utah, our iconic Delicate Arch stands in the heart of a national park. Other national parks and monuments protect our shared heritage and contain irreplaceable treasures sculpted by forces beyond our comprehension, which nourish our spirits and those of millions of visitors.Much of this is due to the Antiquities Act, which that has provided economic and personal benefits to millions of Americans for over 100 years. Passed by a Republican Congress, the Antiquities Act... read more
By David Brodwin
Posted on: June 29, 2015
The world of corporations divides in two when it comes to mobilizing and motivating employees. Some, for example Starbucks and Southwest Airlines, take the high road. They pay above average wages, provide above average training and take steps to engage their workers and keep them happy. Other companies take the low road, cutting wages and benefits as far as possible, then pushing payroll costs even lower with exploitive on-call scheduling.For years, the successful high-road brands have been held up as examples for other businesses to follow. But these examples are often dismissed by... read more
By Connie Evans
Posted on: June 24, 2015
As the still fragile U.S. economy cranks out new jobs, with concerns that a jolt from a world event or higher interest rates could spark a slowdown, much of the public and private sectors have ignored the potential of the nation's smallest businesses to help fuel economic growth.These microbusinesses, enterprises with five or fewer employees, comprise more than 92 percent of U.S. businesses, annually generate $4.8 trillion, and contribute to the employment of more than 41 million people. Yet public policymakers and corporate strategies barely take notice, rarely implementing policies and... read more
By David Brodwin
Posted on: June 22, 2015
A year ago, economist Thomas Piketty stunned the policy world with "Capital in the Twenty-First Century," his analysis of global inequality . His book vaulted to the top of best seller lists, a rare feat for 700 pages of economics. Piketty forced elites to pay attention to inequality again, just as Occupy made inequality an issue in the streets.Now, presidential candidates of both parties profess to care about inequality, though they differ starkly about the causes and solutions. Against this backdrop a British economist, Anthony Atkinson, has come forward with a new book. In "Inequality:... read more
By David Brodwin
Posted on: June 15, 2015
Recently the Environmental Protection Agency issued a new rule to protect America's lakes, rivers and streams. The latest rule prevents the pollution of smaller streams, ditches and wetlands which drain into major rivers. The rule was needed because polluters have changed their practices in response to the Clean Water Act. Prevented from dumping directly into navigable rivers and streams, they move their dumping upstream. A polluter can legally dump toxic waste into a ditch that flows into a navigable river.Of course, the companies that pollute oppose the new rule. They argue that these... read more

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